Terry Collins should be ashamed of himself for Matt Harvey interview

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Former New York Mets manager Terry Collins was interviewed on SNY Tuesday night, discussing Matt Harvey’s past with the franchise. It didn’t come off well.

Harvey discussed his past drug use as part of the Eric Kay trial, involving the death of Harvey’s former teammate Tyler Skaggs. Then of the Los Angeles Angels, Harvey had been mentioned as a possible supplier of the pills Skaggs overdosed on, which he allegedly received from Kay per the New York Times.

The trial is difficult and emotional, as one can imagine. Skaggs was a good friend and teammate of many players on the Angels, with at least four appearing in court along with Skaggs’ widow to discuss his death and the Angels players’ drug use.

Harvey admitted to using cocaine and what he described as oxycodone dating back to his days as a New York Met, when he was managed by Collins.

Terry Collins: Matt Harvey warranted mental health counseling

Collins was first asked if he was surprised about Harvey’s drug use by the New York Post. His answer was damning:

“The answer is, probably not,” Collins told The Post. “There was a testing program going on throughout Major League Baseball. We weren’t allowed to do any of our own stuff. There were accusations that were being thrown around the clubhouse, for sure, but I had no proof of it at all. I can just tell you what guys were saying.”

While this in itself was fine, Collins took matters a step further. He acknowledged that “Harvey’s behavior was erratic enough to warrant counseling with the Mets’ mental skills coach,” per the Post. NY Post writer Mike Puma also mentioned ‘a source’ suggested Harvey had suicidal tendencies.

Collins later gave a radio interview and television interview with SNY, referencing Harvey’s depression and mental health struggles, including giving specific incidents. That, obviously, is not necessary nor should it have been brought to light in the first place.

Harvey admitted to his drug use in front of a federal court. What he doesn’t need is his former manager — someone he trusted with this information — to come forward and give public interviews about his struggles and how it impacted the Mets’ level of success.

If you are struggling with suicidal thoughts or are experiencing a mental health crisis, you can dial the 24/7 National Suicide Prevention hotline at 1-800-273-8255 or go to SuicidePreventionLifeline.org.

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